Rodeo Events

Kitsap County Fair & Stampede 2017 - Hold Onto Your HatKITSAP COUNTY
FAIR & STAMPEDE
AUGUST 23RD - 27TH 2017
          
PLEASE BE PATIENT AS WE UPDATE FOR 2017!
​ ​PRCA PRO RODEO - 3 NIGHTS - 8 EVENTS
THURSDAY-SATURDAY, AUGUST 24TH-26TH AT 6:30 P.M
PRCA Pro Rodeo

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or Purchase at the Box Office

FRIDAY NIGHT - AUGUST 25TH
Man-Up Night

Man Up Crusade

Wear purple and to for public awareness of Domestic Violence. All proceeds go to the YWCA.

SATURDAY NIGHT - AUGUST 26TH

Tough Enough to Wear Pink NightTough Enough To Wear Pink
Wear pink to create awareness of Breast Cancer. All proceeds are donated to a local breast cancer non-profit.

​ ​STAMPEDE COMBOS - INCLUDES FAIR ADMISSION
​ADULTS............................................................................................................
GENERAL ADMISSION COMBO (includes fair admission)
$16.00*
SENIOR (60+) & YOUTH (6-12)............................................................
GENERAL ADMISSION COMBO (Includes fair admission)
$13.00*
ARENA FLOOR COMBO.............................................................................
Get Closer to the Actions (includes fair admission)
$21.00*
BOX SEAT COMBO......................................................................................
Treat your valuable employees, friends, or family to an exciting night of world-class rodeo! (includes fair admission)
​$31.00
​Children 5 and under...............................................................................
*Please note: tickets purchased online have additional fees applied
​Free

 

8 Separate Events Are All Nightly At The Kitsap Stampede!​ ​
Rodeo Events

Bareback Riding – Sponsored by West Hills Chrysler-Jeep-Dodge-Ram
Each competitor climbs onto a horse, which is held in a small pipe or wooden enclosure called a bucking chute. When the rider is ready, the gate of the bucking chute is opened and the horse bursts out and begins to buck. The rider attempts to stay on the horse for eight seconds without touching the horse with his free hand. On the first jump out of the chute, the rider must "mark the horse out." This means he must have the heels of his boots in contact with the horse above the point of the shoulders before the horse's front legs hit the ground. A rider that manages to complete a ride is scored on a scale of 0-50 and the horse is also scored on a scale of 0-50. Scores in the 80s are very good, and in the 90s, are exceptional. A horse who bucks in a spectacular and effective manner will score more points than a horse who bucks in a straight line with no significant changes of direction.

Steer Wrestling - also known as bull dogging - Sponsored by Allen Shearer
Rules of steer wrestling include: The bulldogger's horse must not break the rope barrier in front of it at the beginning of a run, but must wait for the animal escaping from the adjacent chute to release the rope. Breaking the rope barrier early adds a 10 second penalty to the bulldogger's time. If the steer stumbles or falls before the bulldogger brings it down, he must either wait for it to rise or help it up before wrestling it to the ground. If the bulldogger completely misses the steer on his way down, he will receive a "no time".
Typical professional times will be in the range of 3.0 to 10 seconds from the gates opening to the waving of the flag. The steers used today are generally Corriente cattle or longhorns, which weigh between 450–650 pounds, and the human steer wrestlers typically weigh 180–300 pounds.

Team Roping  - Sponsored by Pickett Properties
Team roping also known as heading and heeling is a rodeo event that features a steer (typically a Corriente) and two mounted riders. The first roper is referred to as the "header", the person who ropes the front of the steer, usually around the horns, but it is also legal for the rope to go around the neck, or go around one horn and the nose resulting in what they call a "half head". Once the steer is caught by one of the three legal head catches, the header must dally (wrap the rope around the rubber covered saddle horn) and use his horse to turn the steer to the left. The second is the "heeler", who ropes the steer by its hind feet after the "header" has turned the steer, with a five second penalty assessed to the end time if only one leg is caught. Team roping is the only rodeo event where men and women compete equally together in professionally sanctioned competition, in both single-gender or mixed-gender teams.
Headers - Cowboys who rope the steer's head / Heelers - Cowboys who rope the steer's hind feet

Saddle Bronc Riding - Sponsored by
Bronc riding, either bareback bronc or saddle bronc competition, is a rodeo event that involves a rodeo participant riding on a horse (sometimes called a bronc or bronco), that attempts to throw or buck off the rider. Originally based on the necessary horse breaking skills of a working cowboy, the event is now a highly stylized competition that utilizes horses that often are specially bred for strength, agility, and bucking ability.

Tie-Down Roping - also known as calf roping - Sponsored by Budget Rooter
Calf roping, also known as tie-down roping, is a rodeo event that features a calf and a rider mounted on a horse. The goal of this timed event is for the rider to catch the calf by throwing a loop of rope from a lariat around its neck, dismount from the horse, run to the calf, and restrain it by tying three legs together, in as short a time as possible.

Barrel Racing - Local Racing - Sponsored by Oien Construction
Barrel racing is a rodeo event in which a horse and rider attempt to complete a cloverleaf pattern around preset barrels in the fastest time. Though both boys and girls compete at the youth level and men compete in some amateur venues and jackpots, in collegiate and professional ranks, it is primarily a rodeo event for women. It combines the horse's athletic ability and the horsemanship skills of a rider in order to safely and successfully maneuver a horse in a pattern around three barrels (typically three fifty-five gallon metal or plastic drums) placed in a triangle in the center of an arena.

Bull Riding - Sponsored by Stokes Auction
Bull riding refers to rodeo sports that involve a rider getting on a large bull and attempting to stay mounted while the animal attempts to buck off the rider.
In the American tradition the rider must stay atop the bucking bull for eight seconds. The rider tightly fastens one hand to the bull with a long braided rope. It is a risky sport and has been called "the most dangerous eight seconds in sports." [1]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Professional_Rodeo_Cowboys_Association

Click here for more Rodeo Terminology

 The Big County Fair

The Big County Fair

EVERYDAY
Children 5 & Under FREE!

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    *Please note: tickets purchased online have
additional fees applied

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